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Fulfilling Personal Relationships

The basis for ideal relationships is the capacity to give. We can only give from what we have. By dissolving stress and broadening our awareness, The Transcendental Meditation technique provides the foundation for more nourishing relationships, allowing us to give more appreciation and love to family and friends.

In the book Science of Being and Art of Living, Maharishi writes, “Really good social behavior between people will only be possible when their awareness is broadened, when they are able to see the whole situation, to understand each other more thoroughly, to be aware of each other’s need and attempt to fulfill that need. This naturally necessitates a fully developed consciousness, a right sense of judgment, and all the qualities that only a strong and clear mind possesses.”
During TM practice, a decrease in stress hormones such as adrenaline and cortisol leads to reduced fatigue and stress in life.   Scientific research verifies that people who practice the Transcendental Meditation technique experience less anger, less anxiety, and less depression. They naturally express greater tolerance and patience, harmony, and happiness. After a long day of work, women find that twenty minutes of this meditation revitalizes their inner lives. Spontaneously they create more harmonious relationships and enjoy life in increasing waves of fulfillment.

Related Research

Increased Tolerance
  1. The Journal of Psychology 99 (1978): 121-127.
  2. Dissertation Abstracts International 38 (1978): 3372B -3373B.
  3. Dissertation Abstracts International 38 (1978): 3895B.
Orientation Toward Positive Values
  1. Perceptual and Motor Skills 64 (1987): 1003-101
  2. Improved Problem Solving Ability
  3. Personality and Individual Differences 12 (1991): 1105-1116.
Reduced Anxiety
  1. Stress, Anxiety and Coping, 6 (1993): 245-262
  2. Journal of Clinical Psychology 45 (1989): 957-97
  3. Journal of Clinical Psychology 33 (1977): 1076-1078.
  4. Hospital & Community Psychiatry 26 (1975): 156-159.
Decreased Depression
  1. Journal of Counseling and Development 64 (1986): 212-215.
  2. Verlag Geist und Psyche, 1979.
  3. Zeitschrift fur Klinische Psychologie 7 (1978):235-255.
  4. Journal of Humanistic Psychology 16(3) (1976): 51-60.
  5. Gedrag: Tijdschrift voor Psychologie [Behavior: Journal of Psychology] 4 (1976): 206-218.
Decreased Alcohol and Drug Use
  1. Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly 11 (1994): 219-236.
  2. Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly 11 (1994): 89-117.
  3. Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly 11 (1994): 13-87.
  4. International Journal of the Addictions 26 (1991): 293-325
  5. Bulletin on Narcotics 40(1) (1988): 51-56, 1988.
  6. Journal of Counseling and Development 64 (1986): 212-215
  7. Bulletin of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors 2 (1983): 28-3
  8. Zeitschrift fŸr klinische Psychologie [Journal for Clinical Psychology] 7(4) (1978): 235-255.
  9. International Journal of the Addictions 12 (1977): 729-75
  10. American Journal of Psychiatry 132: 942-945, 1975.
  11. American Journal of Psychiatry 131 (1974): 60-6
  12. Drug Abuse: Proceedings of the International Conference, ed. Chris J.D. Zarafonetis (Philadelphia: Lea and Febiger) (1972): 369-376.
Decreased Smoking
  1. Alcoholism Treatment quarterly 11 (1994): 13-87.
  2. International Journal of the Addictions 26 (1991): 293-325.
  3. Journal of Counseling and Development 64 (1986): 212-215.
  4. Bulletin of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors 2 (1983): 28-33
  5. International Journal of the Addictions 12 (1977): 729-75
  6. American Journal of Psychiatry 132 (1975): 942-945.
Decreased Hostility
  1. Criminal Justice and Behavior 6 (1979): 13-2
  2. Criminal Justice and Behavior 5 (1978): 3-20